Archive for October, 2015

Jesus Was An Immigrant and Poor

Written by Marshall. Posted in Matthew, Matthew 25, New Testament

Matthew 25:35b-36a

Jesus Was An Immigrant and Poor

Prepared by Dr. John E. Marshall

Matt. 25:35b (Holman) I was a stranger and you took Me in.

This is the third of six works in this parable: feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, take in immigrants, clothe the naked, care for the sick, and visit prisoners. Jesus was here highlighting a few of many good deeds required in Christianity. He elsewhere outlined other things we have to do.

These six works needed to be highly stressed. Jesus felt the best way to do this was to drive home their importance in this Judgment Day parable.

Some treat kind deeds as if they are ultimate ends in themselves, as if helping people without ever referring to how to become a Christ-follower is okay. I know not every act of practical benevolence has to be accompanied with the plan of salvation. The Gospel always has kind deeds attached to it, but not all kindnesses have to be accompanied with verbal proclamations of the Gospel. This having been said, I feel a need to remind us something is wrong when the story that impels our kindness is the story that is never told.

We at Second need to hear this. We do well in social compassion and practical benevolence. We falter in sharing the Gospel. We give many cups of cold water; we need to give them more often in Jesus’ name (Mark 9:41).

“Strangers” included foreigners, immigrants,

Beautiful Christianity

Written by Marshall. Posted in Matthew, Matthew 25, New Testament

Matthew 25:31-35a

Beautiful Christianity

Prepared by Dr. John E. Marshall

Matt. 25:31 (Holman) When the Son of Man comes in His glory, and all

the angels with Him, then He will sit on the throne of His glory.

Thus begins the Parable of the Sheep and the Goats, which expresses the heart of Christianity as the earliest believers understood it. This passage, maybe more than any other, brings to prominence the beautiful social ethic championed in Old Testament Judaism and New Testament Christianity.

The other three Gospels—Mark, Luke, and John—have no parallels to this imposing, majestic passage. This detail helps fuel the opinion held by some that the Gospel of Matthew is the most influetial book ever written.

When Jesus returns, He will no longer be a homeless wanderer with only a handful of followers. He will enjoy the retinue of a king; pomp and circumstance will be the order of the day. Heaven’s angels will come behind Him; Earth will snap to attention before Him. On that day, unbelievers will see with their eyes what believers have always seen by faith; Jesus is God.

Jesus will judge us. Nothing will be hidden. Secret sins are temporary, concealed for only a fleeting nanosecond. In the final day, they will all be exposed. His revealing our deeds before judging us will actually be a mercy. We will finally truly know ourselves, and see that what we receive